TODAY'S VIDEO

Six randomized studies examined the relationship between epilepsy seizures and CBD, Cannabis and THC. The findings were very positive.  

Overview

Epilepsy is characterized by unprovoked seizures. The diagnosis of epilepsy follows the experience of two unprovoked seizures that cannot be related to another medical condition, alcohol withdraw or very low blood sugar. The cause is often completely unknown but there is a higher occurrence among those with brain injury or a hereditary link.

With so much media coverage on CBD and cannabis and epilepsy seizures, I wondered is there any real data surrounding cannabis and CBD in regards to the management of seizures. In fact, there is. There’s been six well-done randomized controlled trials on 555 patients in total now, looking at how seizures can be managed with the addition of CBD to anti-epileptic drugs.

Patients with seizures take anti-epileptic drugs which have a significant number of side effects such as dizziness, fatigue and tremor. Many are looking for adjudicative therapy or other ways to control their seizure due to the significant side effects of the drugs. A number of studies have been done looking at the addition of CBD to the normal treatments.

 2016

In one very well done study, 214 patients with poorly controlled seizures (despite treatment with anti-epileptic drugs) were administered a low dose of CBD. This dosage was increased to a much higher dose as the study progressed. The median reduction in seizures for this population was 36.5%.

Approximately one-third of patients who have epilepsy don’t respond to conventional drug treatment. This study therefore attracted an over-representation of people with epilepsy. However there are a number of high-quality randomized controlled trials that suggest that CBD may reduce seizures among children with drug-resistant epilepsy. At this time the evidence base is primarily limited to CBD or CBD-rich extracts. These findings shouldn’t be extended to other cannabis-based products, especially in the pediatric model. But the data in this study is quite valid. I will address some of the other studies in further videos that suggest that CBD is an important adjunctive therapy to the management of refractory seizure.

TRANSCRIPTION

Seizures & Epilepsy Overview

with Mary Clifton, MD

 

With so much media coverage on CBD and cannabis and epilepsy seizures, I wondered is there any real data surrounding cannabis and CBD and management of seizures. In fact, there is. There’s been six well-done randomized controlled trials on 555 patients in total now, looking at how seizures can be managed with the addition of CBD to anti-epileptic drugs.

 

Patients with seizures take anti-epileptic drugs that have a significant number of side effects, dizziness, fatigue, tremor, and many are looking for adjunctive therapy or other ways to control their seizure because the drugs have significant side effects that sometimes really don’t make the patients feel good or really limit their function. A number of studies have been done looking at adding CBD. In one particular study that I really enjoyed, that was very well done, was a study involving 214 patients with seizures that were still poorly controlled despite treatment with anti-epileptic drugs. The seizure patients were enrolled across 11 epilepsy centers in the country and were given CBD initially at a low dose, increasing to a much higher dose as the study time passed. The median reduction in seizures for this population was 36.5%.

 

Approximately one-third of patients who have epilepsy don’t respond to conventional drug treatment. This current study therefore likely attracted an over-representation of people with epilepsy, however there’s a number of high-quality randomized controlled trials that suggest that CBD probably reduces seizures among children with drug-resistant epilepsy. At this time the evidence base is primarily limited to CBD or CBD-rich extracts. These findings shouldn’t be extended to other cannabis-based products, especially in the pediatric model. But there’s good data in this study, and a few more that I’ll present in some other videos, that suggest that CBD is an important adjunctive therapy to the management of refractory seizure

Dr. Mary Clifton

 

Dr. Mary Clifton is an Internal Medicine doctor in New York City, with 20 years of experience in both the hospital and private practice and is also a licensed by the New York State Department of Health to provide medical marijuana and is a recognized expert in CBD, Cannabis, and Medical Marijuana.

She is a published researcher, national speaker on women’s health and osteoporosis, and author of four books, and two new soon-to-be-released books on CBD and Cannabis – what you need to know, how to use them and a COOKBOOK to support ease of use.