TODAY'S VIDEO

Medical marijuana has been reliably tested and treatment assured in the setting of multiple sclerosis. THC and CBD can limit inappropriate neurotransmission that leads to MS-related problems. You can confidently use CBD and THC in the setting of multiple sclerosis.

What is Multiple Sclerosis (MS)?

“Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. MS involves an abnormal response of the body’s immune system, which is directed against the person’s own CNS. The immune system targets myelin, a substance that surrounds and insulates nerves. Damaged myelin then forms scars (sclerosis), giving the disease its name, and these scars are thought to be responsible for most of the wide ranging symptoms that people with MS experience.” Source

A brain and nerve showing the effects of multiple sclerosis and cannabinoids

There have been ongoing research into the effects of treating Multiple Sclerosis (MS) with medical cannabis in hopes of increasing quality of life. Clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of symptoms related to MS have been positive. But with all the perceived risks of medical cannabis, limited scientific evidence, concerns about legal status, social stigma, worry about dependency or worrying about the psychoactive effect about getting high, is it beneficial in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS)? We can say with certainty, yes!

Research Surrounding Multiple Sclerosis (MS) with CBD and other Cannabinoids

The pivotal research was done in 2007 and in the following years surrounding multiple sclerosis and medical marijuana. I would like to share with you a few that really stuck out. 

 2011

One particular randomized, double-blind study of 241 patients stands out for me.  Out of 75% of  patients receiving medical cannabis there was relevant improvements in their multiple sclerosis, with only 10% experiencing episodes of sedation and dizziness. 46% of patients also reported improvements in sleep, with 51% reporting reductions in spasm frequency.

2016

After marijuana was introduced in Italy, a web-based registry began collecting data on all patients prescribed the medication. 1,534 MS patients had data gathered on them from January 2014 to February 2015. And out of this group, 62% had a robust initial response to adding medical cannabis to their treatments. 41% continued with an ongoing positive response at six months with no evidence of abuse or misuse. This data has been repeated in prospective observational studies in Germany and in Italy in 2014 and 2015. 

Conclusion

Medical marijuana has been reliably tested and treatment assured in the setting of multiple sclerosis. THC and CBD can limit inappropriate neurotransmission that leads to MS-related problems. You can confidently use CBD and THC in the setting of multiple sclerosis.

TRANSCRIPTION

Studies on CBD and MS

Mary Clifton, MD

 

With all the perceived risks of medical cannabis, limited scientific evidence, concerns about legal status, social stigma, worry about dependency or worrying about the psychoactive effect about getting high. Is it really beneficial in the setting of multiple sclerosis? We can say with certainty, definitely. The pivotal clinical trials that were done surrounding multiple sclerosis and medical marijuana in 2007 and throughout until 2011, a couple of trials really stick out.

 

One particular trial of 241 patients that were randomized to double-blind treatment for 12 weeks, showed that out of 75% of the patients receiving medical cannabis had clinically relevant improvements in their multiple sclerosis, with only 10% experiencing episodes of sedation and dizziness. 46% of patients also reported improvements in sleep, and 51% reported reductions in spasm frequency. After marijuana was introduced in Italy, a web-based registry began collecting data on all patients prescribed the medication. 1,534 MS patients had data gathered on them from January 2014 to February 2015.

 

And out of that group, 62% had a robust initial response to adding medical cannabis to their treatments. 41% continued with an ongoing great response at six months with no evidence of abuse or misuse. This data has been repeated in prospective observational studies in Germany and in Italy in 2014 and 2015. With similar outcomes in everyday clinical practice, Italy had a more clinically relevant responder rate at the beginning of one month. But the Germans caught right up with them, and in three months their rates were equal, with just again adverse effects of occasional somnolence or dizziness.

 

It appears that medical marijuana has been reliably tested and treatment efficacy assured in the setting of multiple sclerosis, and that the THC and CBD can limit inappropriate neurotransmission that lead to MS-related problems. So you can use it feeling confident and secure in the setting of multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Mary Clifton

 

Dr. Mary Clifton is an Internal Medicine doctor in New York City, with 20 years of experience in both the hospital and private practice and is also a licensed by the New York State Department of Health to provide medical marijuana and is a recognized expert in CBD, Cannabis, and Medical Marijuana.

She is a published researcher, national speaker on women’s health and osteoporosis, and author of four books, and two new soon-to-be-released books on CBD and Cannabis – what you need to know, how to use them and a COOKBOOK to support ease of use.